About

Milwaukee County and its partners have initiated a feasibility study to implement bus rapid transit (BRT) in the 7-mile East-West Corridor connecting downtown Milwaukee and the Milwaukee Regional Medical Center (MRMC) and Milwaukee County Research Park (MCRP).

Multimodal solutions are needed to meet growing travel demand and traffic congestion in the corridor. In communities across the country, BRT has successfully been used to supplement or replace local transit service. BRT offers faster travel times than local service and appeals to a wide range of people, from daily riders to those who may normally avoid using the bus but find BRT as efficient, convenient and more cost effective than driving. Because BRT is more efficient and frequent than local service, it improves access to jobs, health care, education and other essentials of daily life for people across the community.

BRT service provides an attractive and reliable alternative to driving.

BRT service decreases travel times to improve access to jobs, education, health care and other services, and activities.

BRT service can mitigate traffic congestion across the study corridor, including heavy congestion expected during the I-94 reconstruction.

BRT service reduces the need for local government to launch expensive and inconvenient construction projects to rebuild and expand existing local roads.

BRT projects can support economic development. While dependent on local conditions, communities have experienced transit-oriented development ranging from $100 million to $5.8 billion following public investment in BRT projects.

BRT service can be easily expanded into new routes or new communities to meet demand.

BRT service supports more efficient use of limited land within downtown Milwaukee, MRMC and MCRP by reducing the demand for parking at these major employment centers.

With over 125 businesses in the study corridor, each with more than 250 employees, new BRT service presents significant potential to attract new riders and increase overall ridership. New BRT service in other cities has seen ridership increase in the range of 25-50 percent. Typical BRT service would include stops spaced between one-quarter to one-half mile apart, and it would provide a vehicle every 10 minutes during peak travel times.

February 2016

Begin planning and preliminary engineering

Mid-April, late May/early June 2016

Public meetings

June 2016

Select locally preferred alternative

August 2016

Submit application to Federal Transit Administration for Section 5309 Small Starts Grant

Artist's renderings of side-running (left) and center-running (right) BRT created for the North-South Corridor Study in Chapel Hill, NC. Renderings used with permission.

Locally Preferred Alternative

The map below shows the locally preferred alternative for the East-West BRT routes and station locations. The cities of Milwaukee and Wauwatosa and Milwaukee County are studying this alternative based on technical analyses and input from stakeholders and the general public.

Study Library

The following documents have been published as part of the East-West BRT Feasibility Study.

Project Management Plan

Public Engagement Plan

Study Purpose and Need Statement

Tech Report: Existing Conditions

Evaluation and Screening Framework

Tier 1 Evaluation

Tier 2: Detailed Definition of Alternatives

Tier 2: Conceptual Plans

Locally Preferred Alternative Report

Public Engagement Summary

Financial Plan

Implementation Plan

NEPA Class of Action Request

CONTACT

To:

contact@eastwestbrt.com

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© 2016 │ Milwaukee county

The map below shows the locally preferred alternative for the East-West BRT routes and station locations. The cities of Milwaukee and Wauwatosa and Milwaukee County are studying this alternative based on technical analyses and input from stakeholders and the general public.

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Multimodal solutions are needed to meet growing travel demand and traffic congestion in the corridor. In communities across the country, BRT has successfully been used to supplement or replace local transit service. BRT offers faster travel times than local service and appeals to a wide range of people, from daily riders to those who may normally avoid using the bus but find BRT as efficient, convenient and more cost effective than driving. Because BRT is more efficient and frequent than local service, it improves access to jobs, health care, education and other essentials of daily life for people across the community.

BRT service provides an attractive and reliable alternative to driving.

BRT service decreases travel times to improve access to jobs, education, health care and other services, and activities.

BRT service can mitigate traffic congestion across the study corridor, including heavy congestion expected during the I-94 reconstruction.

BRT service reduces the need for local government to launch expensive and inconvenient construction projects to rebuild and expand existing local roads.

BRT projects can support economic development. While dependent on local conditions, communities have experienced transit-oriented development ranging from $100 million to $5.8 billion following public investment in BRT projects.

BRT service can be easily expanded into new routes or new communities to meet demand.

BRT service supports more efficient use of limited land within downtown Milwaukee, MRMC and MCRP by reducing the demand for parking at these major employment centers.

With over 125 businesses in the study corridor, each with more than 250 employees, new BRT service presents significant potential to attract new riders and increase overall ridership. New BRT service in other cities has seen ridership increase in the range of 25-50 percent. Typical BRT service would include stops spaced between one-quarter to one-half mile apart, and it would provide a vehicle every 10 minutes during peak travel times.

February 2016

Begin planning and preliminary engineering

Mid-April, late May/early June 2016

Public meetings

June 2016

Select locally preferred alternative

August 2016

Submit application to Federal Transit Administration for Section 5309 Small Starts Grant

Artist's renderings of side-running (top) and center-running (bottom) BRT created for the North-South Corridor Study in Chapel Hill, NC. Renderings used with permission.

The following documents have been published as part of the East-West BRT Feasibility Study.

Project Management Plan

Public Engagement Plan

Study Purpose and Need Statement

Tech Report: Existing Conditions

Tier 1 Evaluation

Tier 2: Detailed Definition of Alternatives

Tier 2: Conceptual Plans

Evaluation and Screening Framework

Locally Preferred Alternative Report

Public Engagement Summary

Financial Plan

Implementation Plan

NEPA Class of Action Request

Receive Study Updates